Scientist turned Storyteller

A is for Ask

As kids, we had no problem asking for what we wanted, but we learned to stop doing it over time.

And no wonder:

“Mom, can I have that?”

“No.”

“Mrs. Jones, can I do my homework this way?”

“No.”

“Dad, can I stay up and watch TV?”

“No.”

But our reluctance to ask for our desires as big kids is a problem, the way I see it.

And I see it in two different ways: in an earthly way and a non-earthly way.

The earthly way follows this simple logic:

If you don’t ask people for what you want, the answer is effectively “no.”

So if you really want that raise, you’d better ask for it, mama.

The non-earthly way I see things follows this thinking:

Jesus said, Ask, and it shall be given to you for a reason.

I’ve decided that reason is because it’s true.

Therefore, it would be wise for us to re-learn to ask for stuff again.

But to ask in a Jesus sort of way, take people out of the equation.

Ask the Universe, or God, or angels, or whatever nonphysical something you believe in.

Yes, I know that decades ago you asked God fervently for a pink pony that never materialized.

But here’s the deal:

God doesn’t grant requests that go against nature, even when made by cute kids.

Had you, perhaps, asked for a brown pony, you may have been bestowed one.

Maybe.

Looking at my life, I could say that I have a so-so prayer batting average.

However, I decided to think about my seemingly unanswered requests this way, which can also explain why you weren’t certain to have received a brown pony had you asked for one:

Perhaps the most loving thing that God could do when it comes to our prayers is to answer by not delivering on the ones that aren’t in our best interest.  

Like, THANK GOD for not hooking you up with that bad news person you prayed to date in college!

I’m making light of this, but in all seriousness, I think that God, Universe etc. etc. supports furthering those things that are for our best, which, by the way, may not always feel that way.

Which, very often, don’t feel that way (more on this later).

And I also think that there’s another reason that our asks don’t seem to get answered:

We ask, but block our good from coming to us.

We’d rather place blame than to receive our good.

We’d rather not to forgive than to receive our good.

We’d rather pass judgment than to receive our good.

Understand that I’m not making the argument that if you don’t do right, your good won’t come.

I’m making the argument that we give power to what we focus on.

By focusing on blame, unforgiveness, passing judgment and all other things that rob us of our peace, “un-peace” looms larger in our lives.

And blocks our good.

But if good is what you want, ask for it.

And expect it to be given to you.

But also don’t be badmouthing God for not giving you what you want if you insist on asking for stuff that isn’t good for you, or other people involved, in the big picture.

Or when you insist on acting funky while waiting for answers to appropriate requests!

 

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